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North west Africa has much detail, including Egypt and the Nile...<br />
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One of the world's first printed atlases that contains a bizarre and distorted map of Britain has emerged for sale for 90,000 pounds.<br />
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The unrecognisable shape of the British Isles was an interpretation of the works of Roman mathematician, astrologer and geographer Claudius Ptolemaeus.<br />
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Claudius lived between 90-168 AD and wrote about the world's geography in the Roman Empire.<br />
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It wasn't until 1300 years later after the process of printing developed that Claudius' works were turned into a printed atlas, called Cosmographia.<br />
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One rare copy of the book has now emerged for sale in London.<br />
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On the pages that covers Britain, the outline for the coast of France, Belgium and Holland is comparitvely accurate.<br />
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Yet, the British Isles are bent right out of shape and looking twice as thin as it did in reality.<br />
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The south west of England, famous for its rugged coastline, is a rectangular shape with straight lines, while the south east from Southampton to Kent is pushed upwards at a 45 degree angle.<br />
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The rest of England is much narrower, and the east coast is where Birmingham, Nottingham and Leeds should be.<br />
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Although the Wales coastline is recognisble, Scotland appears to have grown a large appendage that sticks out into the North Sea and spreads across to where Norway is.<br />
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Because Britain is half the size it should be, the North Sea, or Oceanus Germanicus, is twice as wide.