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BNPS.co.uk (01202 558833)<br />
Pic: PhilYeomans/BNPS<br />
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Fungi fanatics John and Doreen Bailey closely inspect fungi at Tyntesfield.<br />
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Funghi fest, A National Trust estate untouched by modern fertilisers and chemicals has revealed an unrivalled collection of over 1000 different species of fungi, some identified for the first time, by a eccentric couple of fungi fanatics.<br />
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The Tyntesfield estate bought by the Trust for £25 million in 2002 has been revealed as one of the top places in Britain for mushrooms, with more than 1,000 varieties identified within its small grounds.<br />
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Fungi fanatics John and Doreen Bailey have spent the last 10 years tirelessly scouring 150-acre Tyntesfield cataloguing every single mushroom they find including one never-seen-before type.<br />
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They say that the sheer diversity of fungi they have found is thanks to the absence of modern farming techniques and the unique combination of woodland and grassland at the National-Trust-owned estate near Bristol, Somerset. <br />
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Ironically, Tyntesfield is the ancestral home of businessman William Gibbs who made his fortune in the 1800s importing guano - bird excrement -  from South America for use as fertiliser.