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BNPS.co.uk (01202 558833)<br />
Pic: ThamesHudson/BNPS<br />
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A post-war increase in traffic and therefore road accidents led to campaigns and poster such as this one (1963).<br />
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Nothing new in the nanny state. <br />
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These nagging posters highlight Britain's 'nanny state' approach to post-war life in an age before television and the internet.<br />
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The posters show successive British governments' attempts to control and influence every aspect of the lives of their citizens through visual messages.<br />
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They were born out of the state's optimistic view for a post-war Britain in which every family would be properly fed, clothed and cared for.<br />
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Dating back to the mid 1940s, the posters were issued by various government ministries and departments with a view to making life better for Britons.<br />
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They sought to influence numerous areas of everyday life including health, hygeine, holidays, food, work, pensions, savings and crime.<br />
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One poster, titled 'The seven rules of health', reminds people on how to keep clean and healthy by exercising, getting enough sleep and washing.<br />
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Published by the Ministry of Health for Scotland in the early 1950s, it advises people to put clean underwear on once a week.<br />
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It also urges them to wash all over every day claiming "it takes a bit of time but it's worth it, and so refreshing".