Huge captured Tricolour from Napoleonic French warship.

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BNPS.co.uk (01202 558833)<br />
Pic: NorfolkMuseum/BNPS<br />
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Back on show after 100 years...<br />
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Staff at Norwich Museum reveal one of the earliest captured French Tricolour's from the Napoleonic Wars -  which was dramatically siezed from the French warship Le Généreux, on February 18, 1800.<br />
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The huge Ensign of Le Généreux (it measures 16m x 8.3m – roughly the size of a tennis-court) is one of the most iconic objects connected to Norfolk’s most famous son, Admiral Lord Nelson.<br />
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Evidence suggests that it is, quite possibly, one of the earliest, if not the earliest, Tricolour in existence. The design of the French Tricolour as we know it today – with the order of colours from left to right running blue, white and red – was the new flag of the French Republic after the 1794 revolution.<br />
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Ruth Battersby-Tooke, Curator of Costume and Textiles at Norwich Castle, said: “The Ensign is remarkable for its survival in such a complete state, the oldest French Ensign in the UK and the one with the most stirring and thrilling history.”<br />
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It will form the centrepiece of this summer’s Nelson & Norfolk exhibition, at Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery, which explores Nelson’s relationship with his home county (on view from July 29 to October 1, 2017).<br />
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***These images are available for editorial purposes only in connection with the exhibition Nelson & Norfolk at Norwich Castle Museum and Art Gallery***